Legless Leopard

Photo courtesy of soulrider67, some rights reserved.

Saturday night is Eurovision night.  I’ll be at a refined summer wedding, but for those of you hosting a party to celebrate the campest night of the year, what could be more appropriate than a Flirtini/Bucks Fizz cross?

The Flirtini is a fruity/flirty orange and pineapple concoction which is normally finished with champagne.  For the Eurovision alternative, we’ll be topping it with Bucks Fizz:

  1. Add 3/4 measure of vodka, 3/4 measure of triple sec and two measures of pineapple juice to a shaker of ice.
  2. Shake well and double strain into a martini glass.
  3. Top up with Bucks Fizz (two parts orange juice to one part champagne).
  4. Garnish with a cherry.

Bucks Fizz (in case you’re interested) is named for London’s Buck’s Club (the inspiration for Bertie Wooster’s very own Drones Club) and was first poured in 1921 as an excuse to start drinking at breakfast, so I guess this one will work just as well on Sunday Morning.

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Champagne French Martini

Photo courtesy of StuartWebster, some rights reserved.

All celebrations are special, but for a really special celebration (perhaps a Princess’s birthday?) something quite exquisite is required. I’ve never really understood what makes a French Martini a Martini, because apart from the glass they are nothing alike, but the addition of Champagne certainly makes this French Martini even more French.

The ever-so simple but effective French-Martini.com explains that originally a French Martini was just a Martini made with a French vermouth, which makes literal sense, although apart from national pride (thank you, L’Académie Française!) perhaps doesn’t warrant the naming of a whole new drink.

As a result, therefore, we can only assume that the French Martini as we now know it was developed for those who cannot face the prospect of a genuine Martini just yet, but want to pretend they’re enjoying a distant relative of the drink enjoyed by those embodiments of suave, Humphrey Bogart and Mae West.

Of course the French Martini is a variant of the Martini in the loosest possible sense, as it contains neither of the ingredients of a traditional Martini, and unlike its namesake is fruity, crisp and super-sweet in equal measure.

To make a delectable celebratory version of this sweet treat proceed as follows:

  1. Add a measure of vanilla vodka, 2/3 measure of Chambord black raspberry liqueur and 1/2 measure of pineapple juice to a shaker of ice.
  2. Shake well and strain into a martini glass (also works well in tea cups, jam jars and plant pots).
  3. Top up with Champagne and garnish with a raspberries.