Wiggo Martini

A quick midweek #modwiggmartini post  to celebrate the hero status of Britain’s most successful Olympian (and first Tour de France winner) Bradley Wiggins.

The Wiggo Martini is a simple twist on the standard dry martini, with a measure of King’s Ginger ginger liqueur replacing the vermouth in honour of the great man’s trademark sideburns.

If you cut a long enough piece of lemon peel you can also recreate the sidies effect by curling the twist up both sides of the glass.

  1. Add three measures of gin and half a measure of King’s Ginger to a shaker of ice.
  2. Shake or stir well (depending on your preference) and strain into a chilled martini glass (or cycling water bottle)
  3. Garnish with a twist of lemon, an allen key or a spoke.

Disclaimer:  Remember to drink responsibly and don’t drink and cycle.

Breakfast in Manhattan

It’s been a while since I’ve had a #midweekmanhattan post, so I thought it required something a little special.  It therefore gives me great pleasure to introduce a new series for House of Bourbon: Breakfast Booze!

A natural progression from our existing tea-infused recipes, this series will branch out to explore other drinks which include traditional breakfast foodstuffs.  While we’re not necessarily endorsing the idea that every breakfast should include an dipsological experiment, there is something to be said to raising a Bloody Mary or a Breakfast Martini on special occasions.

The ideal cross-over post to launch a series of drinks featuring popular breakfast ingredients is therefore the Breakfast in Manhattan, a cross between a classic English breakfast Martini and a traditional Manhattan.  Perfect for anyone who enjoys an orangey punch to their whiskey cocktails.

To start your day with a breakfast-appropriate Manhattan:

  1. Stir a teaspoon of marmalade with a large measure of whiskey in a mixing glass until the marmalade has dissolved.
  2. Add a small measure of sweet vermouth and a sploosh of orange bitters.
  3. Add ice, stir well and double strain into a martini glass.
  4. Garnish with a twist of orange.

Right Hand / Left Hand

I picked up a bottle of the ever-so exotically named Xocolatl Mole Bitters today, a cacao and cinnamon based cocktail bitter which is a staple of a number of Central American influenced cocktails.

Xocolatl Mole is named for the Aztec word xocolātl (meaning “bitter water”) which became known in the English-speaking world as chocolate; and mole (or mōlli), a traditional form of Mexican sauce.  As you would expect, therefore, the bitters have a strong flavour of spiced chocolate with prominent cinnamon and chili notes.

A sploosh or two of Xocolatl Mole is a key ingredient in a number of recipes; the most famous of which is the Right Hand, a rum-based Negroni or Boulevardier variant, which is given distinctive chocolate notes by the bitters.

The Right Hand appears to be a recent invention and is credited to Michael McIlroy, bartender at New York’s twin bars Milk and Honey and Little Branch, as recently as 2007.

  1. Add a large measure of aged rum to a mixing glass of ice.
  2. Add a measure of sweet vermouth, Campari and two splooshes of Xocolatl Mole bitters.
  3. Stir well and strain into a cocktail glass.

The most popular variant of the Right Hand is the Left Hand, which is made with bourbon in place of rum, and a lemon or orange variant of either can be made by including a sploosh or two of the respective bitters and a twist of peel.